Civilian Conservation Corps 

The Civilian Conservation Corps in Alabama, 1933-1942: A Great and Lasting Good
Have you traveled the road to Pea Vine Falls at Oak Mountain State Park? Stayed in a stone cabin at Cheaha State Park? Visited the Moundville Archeological Museum south of Tuscaloosa? These were built by the CCC, often called “Roosevelt’s Tree Army,” during the Great Depression.

The CCC (the Civilian Conservation Corps) was one of the federal make-work projects of the era, one that did a lot of good for forests, recreation, and the men for whom it provided short-term jobs. Between 1933 and 1942, an average of 30 camps operated across Alabama. CCC boys helped fight fires, reforest lands, protect the state’s then newly acquired national forests and build roads and recreational facilities in its state parks. -- from the press release: Roosevelt’s Tree Army Arrives at the Library

There were no CCC projects in Jefferson County. However, many boys from Jefferson County worked for the CCC and many of us have enjoyed time spent in an Alabama State Park that was built by the CCC.

For more information about the CCC in Alabama, check out the book The Civilian Conservation Corps in Alabama, 1933-1942 : a great and lasting good by Robert Pasquill, Jr.

A Great and Lasting Good - The Civilian Conservation Corps in the Birmingham Area, Part 1

A Great and Lasting Good - The Civilian Conservation Corps in the Birmingham Area, Part 2